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Frequently Asked Questions

Where can I go to get the best information on Covid 19 return to play for cricket?

 

Visit Queensland Cricket’s Covid 19 Return to Play webpage at qldcricket.com.au/covid-19-return-to-play. This page is designed as a one-stop shop for all your Covid 19 related questions relating to cricket in Queensland.


Will cricket organisations be liable for Covid 19-related issues such as a local outbreak?

 

Cricket organisations should not be held liable for Covid 19-related issues, but should not be negligent in addressing Covid 19 issues and concerns. 

It is in the best interests of Cricket Associations and Clubs to adhere to the Industry Covid Safe Plan for Field Sports, refer to the Cricket Australia Return to Play Guidelines, appoint a COVID Safety

Coordinator, demonstrate a plan is in place, and communicate the plan to all its members. 

Cricket organisations generally should be able to demonstrate that they have taken reasonable steps to prevent Covid 19-related issues. 


What if I can’t meet social distancing requirements in training?

 

If a training drill in the nets requires there to be no social distancing to train appropriately for the game, and/or uphold the integrity of the rules, then players don’t have to be socially distant.  Associations and Clubs need to ask - can I modify this activity and get the same result if I wasn’t being socially distant?  If not, then they should be ok to not have social distancing in place for a particular training drill.


Does our club have to register players and spectators at games and training for tracing purposes?

 

Yes. Contact tracing requirements for games and training are set out in Appendix 2, on page 23 of the Industry Covid Safe Plan. This includes keeping records for a minimum of 56 days.


Will the umpire hold a bowler’s hat or jumper during a game?

 

This is one of a number of cricket-specific issues yet to be fully resolved. A commonsense approach is required. Both the Field Team Sports Industry Covid Safe Plan and Cricket Australia COVID19 Guidelines for Cricket Activity specifies no sharing of personal equipment, and strict sanitisation requirements for essential shared equipment (e.g. balls, stumps). 

A commonsense solution may be to provide umpires with a belt clip or other holding device that bowlers could operate themselves to hold a hat or other clothing, and that could be easily sanitised by the umpire between overs.  


What will happen if a player is caught shining the ball with saliva or sweat?

 

This is one of several cricket-specific issues yet to be fully resolved in Australia. A commonsense approach is required. The ICC ruling regarding saliva is reproduced here:

Ban on applying saliva to the ball: Players will not be permitted to use saliva to shine the ball. If a player does apply saliva to the ball, the umpires will manage the situation with some leniency during an initial period of adjustment for the players, but subsequent instances will result in the team receiving a warning. 

A team can be issued up to two warnings per innings but repeated use of saliva on the ball will result in a 5-run penalty to the batting side. Whenever saliva is applied to the ball, the umpires will be instructed to clean the ball before play recommences.

Cricket Australia are still yet to confirm their stance on this ruling, but it is reasonable to expect that it will likely reflect a similar outcome to above. 


Can we share scoring responsibilities / scorebooks?

 

This is one of several cricket-specific issues yet to be fully resolved. A commonsense approach is required.

It is recognised that many community cricket clubs under normal circumstances do not have a dedicated scorer at each game, and share scorebooks between intermittent scorers on both teams.

Both the Field Team Sports Industry Covid Safe Plan and Cricket Australia COVID19 Guidelines for Cricket Activity specifies no sharing of personal equipment, and strict sanitisation requirements for essential shared equipment (e.g. balls, stumps). 

A commonsense solution may be to insist at least on heavy sanitising of hands, pens, tablets and/or tables and scorebook pages (a suitable anti-viral spray?) where these items need to be shared for the purposes of allowing a game to proceed.  Associations and Clubs may also consider the use of disposable gloves.


Can we serve food and drink at our club?

 

Yes, providing relevant Covid Safe requirements are met. Requirements for food service issues are covered under a separate Industry Covid Safe Plan for dining at Restaurants, Cafes, Pubs, Clubs, RSL clubs and Hotels. There is a link to this plan on our web page.


Can we share equipment in club cricket kits?

 

The Field Team Sports Industry Covid Safe Plan and Cricket Australia COVID19 Guidelines for Cricket Activity specifies no sharing of personal playing equipment, and strict sanitisation requirements for essential shared equipment (e.g. balls, stumps). 

Using common sense, bats may be able to be sanitised between users, but any personal equipment worn against the body such as helmets, boxes, gloves and some pads should not be shared.


What are the rules for transport and accommodation for visiting / touring teams?

 

Traveling teams should refer to the QLD Tourism and Accommodation Industry Covid-Safe Plan. This plan can be accessed here.

Where commercial bus transport and hotel accommodation are utilised for team travel, the relevant businesses could be expected to be responsible for providing services that are Covid-safe, and to adhere to the plan described above. 


Can my club run an event, for example a presentation day or sign-up day?

 

Yes. However, there are some significant caveats:

Sport-related events under 100 people can proceed with appropriate social distancing (4 metre rule), registration and hygiene requirements in place.

Other events organised and run by sporing organisations complying with an approved COVID Safe Plan do not require additional approval outlined in the Industry Framework for Events. However, organisations and providers should review and consider the Key Public Health Principles and Event Specific Public Health Strategies set out in the Industry Framework for Events. A useful part of this Framework is the flow diagram showing what is required for your event to proceed in a Covid Safe way.

More information on the relevant approvals can be found here. 


When can our club start using our change rooms again?

 

A recent amendment to the Industry Covid Safe Plan for Field Sports enables the return to use of change rooms at sporting venues. 

The definition of “field of play” has now been extended to incorporate the use of change rooms by active participants, allowing the full team and required coaching / medical officials without the occupant density requirements, providing other elements of the Industry Plan are observed (eg Registration of attendees, sanitisation procedures).


Is online player registration (MyCricket) suitable for Covid Safe tracking purposes for players?

 

Unfortunately, the requirements for registration include entry and exit times, which do not register automatically on MyCricket. If your team arrives and exits the venue at the same times, MyCricket data can be used, with the addition of a standardised entry and exit time attached.  You must also confirm and capture each individuals answer to whether they have had any COVID-19 symptoms, been in contact with any confirmed/suspected COVID-19 case, or travelled internationally in the past 14 days.


What are our club’s responsibilities with regard to privacy where personal information has been collected for Covid Safe purposes?

 

Personal data collection for Covid Safe purposes is compulsory under a direction of the Department of Health and the Chief Health Officer.

Clubs or organisations collecting data should make their best endeavour to store and protect collected data for the required period of 56 days.

Further information is available from the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner


Where clubs don’t have enough helmets and/or personal equipment, can we share them?

 

The simple answer is no.

Where it is deemed absolutely necessary for helmets or personal equipment to be shared between players (eg where a game can’t proceed without the need for sharing), heavy sanitisation is required between users.


Where can I go to get specific information on Indoor Cricket Covid Safe requirements?

 

Indoor Cricket will operate under a separate Industry Covid Safe Plan for Indoor Sports. 


Do we need to maintain a 5m gap between playing groups for Entry Level Programs?

 

No. In Stage 3, the four metres squared per player / participant rule over-rides other social distancing requirements. As long as your venue allows enough space for one player / participant per 4m2, and effort is made to socially distance at 1.5 metres, there is no longer a requirement under the Industry Covid Safe Plan to maintain the previously prescribed 5 metre space between playing groups for Entry Level Programs.

 


How often should we sanitise the ball at training and in play? What can be used to clean the ball?

 

In training, it’s preferable that each player has their own ball to train with. If multiple balls is not possible, please ensure the ball is sanitised as often as possible between bowlers in nets, and between fielding drills. It is essential that players maintain excellent hand hygiene at training.

 

In an on-field game situation, it is not practical to use multiple balls. Discuss with your umpire. Ball should be sanitised at the end of each over or whenever possible. Please ensure heavier sanitisation between innings’ where same ball is used.

 

There is currently no official guideline to determine method of sanitisation. Commonsense approach is required. Some clubs are using an alcohol wipe, or a suitable disinfectant spray to sanitise the ball, to ensure minimal ‘wetting’ and good sanitisation.


Can players stand closer than 1.5 metres during a game (eg wicket keeper up close to stumps to attempt a stumping dismissal)?

 

Yes. A wicket keeper can stand close to the stumps within 1.5 metres of the batsman if they so wish, and attempt/perform stumpings. Another example where standing closer than 1.5 metres is allowed, is slips fielders standing close to the keeper during a game where this is the desired field position.

 

Please limit situations where players stand within 1.5 metres of one another to on-field game situation.